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Old Fashioned Oatmeal Cookies

This is the best old fashioned oatmeal cookies recipe you’ll ever make. They’re soft and chewy with crispy edges and full of hearty oats, warming cinnamon, and plump, sweet raisins. Make a batch and your family will love these delicious oatmeal raisin cookies!

Don’t like raisins? Make oatmeal cookies without raisins, frosted oatmeal cookies, or our tasty cranberry walnut oatmeal cookies!

overhead view of old fashioned oatmeal cookies.

Old fashioned oatmeal raisin cookies

These old-fashioned cookies are perfect for a cookie exchange or just to eat all by yourself.

Thanks to the rolled oats, cinnamon, brown sugar, and raisins, they have the perfect amount of sweetness and flavor while being moist and chewy.

The recipe comes together quickly, is easy to make, and only requires a handful of simple pantry staples.

They are the best oatmeal raisin cookies, if I do say so myself.

If you’ve got extra oatmeal leftover from the cookies, try our no-bake oatmeal cookie recipe, banana oatmeal breakfast cookies, and triple berry oat smoothie.

old fashioned oatmeal ingredients.
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Ingredients

Here’s the shopping list to help you gather your ingredients for old fashioned oats cookies. Refer to the recipe card below for exact measurements!

  • Light brown sugar gives the cookies a sweet, caramel-like flavor and chewy texture.
  • Granulated sugar adds sweetness, helps the cookies spread, and creates a slightly crisp exterior.
  • Butter makes the cookies rich, buttery, and moist. I always use salted butter in my baking to balance out the sweetness.
  • Egg: An egg acts as a binder to hold the dough together and give the cookies a light texture.
  • Vanilla: A touch of vanilla extract adds a warm, sweet aroma that enhances the oat and raisin flavors.
  • Old-fashioned rolled oats: I like to use old fashioned oats (rolled oats) in this recipe. They remain whole in size and guarantee a chewy texture.
  • All-purpose flour is important to give our old fashioned oats cookie recipe structure.
  • Baking powder helps the cookies rise.
  • Ground cinnamon: Oats, raisins, and ground cinnamon is a winning combination.
  • Raisins: My family loves sweet, plump raisins in oatmeal cookies. But if you’re opposed to raisins, check out the mix-ins section below for other goodies you can mix into your oatmeal cookies.
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Substitutions

  • Quick oats are rolled thinner than traditional oats, which helps them cook faster and will give the cookies a softer, less chewy texture.
  • Dark brown sugar: Instead of light brown sugar, opt for dark brown sugar. Dark brown sugar contains more molasses and will give your oatmeal cookies a richer flavor.
  • Unsalted butter: If using unsalted butter, be sure to add 1/4 teaspoon of salt
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Equipment

To make old fashioned oatmeal cookies from scratch, you’ll need the following:

  • Measuring tools to measure the ingredients.
  • Large mixing bowl and mixer or a stand mixer to mix the cookie dough.
  • Spatula or wooden spoon for mixing.
  • Ice cream scoop to measure the cookies.
  • Cookie sheets and baking paper for baking.
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How to make old-fashioned oatmeal cookies

Made in just 1 bowl in 20 minutes, this is the easiest oatmeal cookie recipe you’ll ever make! Let’s go over the recipe step-by-step to get started.

step 1 combine dry ingredients.

1. Combine dry ingredients

  • In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, oats, baking powder, and cinnamon; set aside.
step 2 cream butter and sugar.

2. Cream butter and sugar

  • Beat the softened butter with both sugars on medium speed until light and fluffy.
step 3 incorporate egg and vanilla.

3. Incorporate egg and vanilla

  • Reduce speed to low; add the egg and vanilla. Beat until well combined, about 1 minute.
step 4 mix dry and wet ingredients.

4. Mix dry and wet ingredients

  • Add flour mixture; mix until almost combined.
step 5 add raisins.

5. Add raisins

  • Using a rubber spatula or cooking spoon, stir in raisins.
step 6 refrigerate cookie dough.

6. Refrigerate dough

  • Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and chill the dough for one hour or overnight.
step 7 scoop cookies.

7. Scoop cookies

  • Using an ice cream scooper, drop heaping tablespoon-size balls of dough about 2 inches apart onto the lined baking sheets.
step 8 bake oatmeal cookies.

8. Bake

  • Bake until the cookies are golden around the edges, but still soft in the center, 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Remove from oven and let cool on the cookie sheet for 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely.
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Baking tips

Old fashioned oatmeal cookies are pretty easy to make, and here are my best tips to keep in mind so yours turn out perfectly.

  • Correctly measure the flour: To properly measure your flour, spoon the flour into the measuring cup until it overflows. Then, use the back of a knife to level the measuring cup at the top. If you press your measuring cup into the flour bag, you will pack in too much flour, resulting in cake-like cookies.
  • Use room temperature ingredients to ensure the butter creams properly, and the egg disperse more evenly into the dough. If you forgot to take out the egg, soak it in a bowl of warm water for 10 minutes to warm them quickly.
  • Soak the raisins: For fruity, plump raisins in your cookies, place them into a small, heat-resistant bowl and cover them with hot water. Let soak for 10 to 15 minutes. Then drain and pat dry before stirring them into the dough.
  • Cream the butter and sugars: By beating the butter with the sugars, you’re fluffing up the butter with air, which gives the cookies body and a wonderful, soft texture.
  • Shape the cookies with a cookie scoop to ensure the cookies all have the same size. I recommend a large cookie scoop that can hold 3 tablespoons of dough because who doesn’t love big oatmeal cookies?
  • Watch the bake time: The centers should look slightly underdone when you take the oatmeal cookies out of the oven. They will continue to set on the baking sheets. For a softer version, take them out a little early. And for crispier cookies, bake a little longer.
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Serving suggestions

Nothing is better than a warm, freshly baked oatmeal raisin cookie with a tall glass of milk. It’s a classic combo that you can’t go wrong with!

Sometimes, I like to drizzle a little with icing over the top of my cookies.

I find that extra sweetness is just so delicious with this old fashioned oatmeal cookie recipe.

stack of 3 oatmeal raisin cookies.
Variation Icon

Mix-ins

While classic oatmeal cookies are most definitely delicious, it’s super easy to fold your favorite mix-ins, like chocolate chips or nuts, into the dough.

  • Butterscotch chips: Sweet and creamy butterscotch morsels add a rich, buttery flavor to these oat cookies. 1 cup is a good starting point.
  • Chocolate chips: Add chocolate chips to the dough and the cookies will taste like Chick-fil-A cookies. Regular, mini, white, milk, semisweet – any kind will taste delicious!
  • Nuts: Stir 1/2 to 1 cup chopped walnuts, pecans, or hazelnuts into the batter for extra crunch.
  • Dried fruits: Dried cranberries or chopped dried apricots a great substitutes for raisins.
  • Molasses adds extra moisture and makes the cookies taste just like grandma’s old fashioned oatmeal cookies. Add 1 tablespoon.
  • Spices: Play with the spices and add a pinch of ground nutmeg and/or cloves. Or use pumpkin pie spice instead of cinnamon.
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Holiday gifting

I love baking big batches for the holidays! Together with ginger cookies, snowballs, and sugar cookies, old fashioned oats oatmeal cookies make the perfect holiday food gift!

Put them in a jar with a pretty bow and give them away during the holiday season. Everyone will love getting a jar of classic oatmeal cookies as a gift!

oatmeal raisin cookie recipe with bite taken out.
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Storage instructions

How to store old fashioned oatmeal cookies

Keep your oatmeal cookies covered in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days. They can dry out if not covered.

Make oatmeal raisin cookies ahead of time

There are several ways to make oatmeal cookies with old fashioned oats ahead of time.

One is to prepare the cookie dough and chill it in the fridge for up to 4 days, then bring it to room temperature right before baking.

Alternatively, freeze the cookie dough for later – I’ll show you how to do it below.

Freeze oatmeal cookies

I prefer to freeze the unbaked dough (versus the baked cookies), so that the cookies taste fresher. Here is what to do:

  1. Scoop out the dough with a cookie scoop and place on a prepared baking sheet.
  2. Flash-freeze the dough balls for about 30 minutes, or until hardened.
  3. Transfer the dough balls to a zip-top bag and store them in the freezer for up to 3 months.
  4. When ready to eat, place the frozen dough balls on a baking sheet and let thaw while the oven preheats. The cookies may need a little longer in the oven since you’re baking from frozen.
FAQ Icon

FAQ

What are old-fashioned oats?

Old-fashioned oats or rolled oats are whole oats that have been steamed and flattened. Rolled oats maintain their size when baking and give cookies a chewy texture. And you’ll be able to see oatmeal pieces in the baked cookies.

Can I use quick oats in these cookies?

Sure! Quick oats are essentially chopped old-fashioned oats. Quick oats will give your cookies a finer consistency, and the finished cookies will look less rugged.

Why are my oatmeal cookies flat?

Old fashioned oatmeal cookies spread a little as you bake them in the oven. However, if they flatten out too much, it could be one of the reasons below:
 
Not enough flour: If the dough is too wet, you’ll end up with flat, greasy cookies. Add more flour to the batter.

Too much butter or the butter was too warm: This can also result in flat cookies.

You forgot baking powder: Baking powder gives the cookies some height.

Why didn’t my oatmeal cookies spread?

If your old fashioned oatmeal raisin cookies remain little balls of dough, you may have added too much flour.

That can happen if you pack the flour into your measuring cup. Instead, use the spoon and swipe method or a digital kitchen scale to measure your flour.

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Do you love homemade cookies? Me too! We have a few more easy and delicious cookie recipes for you to try! Start with these:

Did you enjoy this recipe? Give it a 5-star rating ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ and leave a comment! Appreciate it so much, thank you!

If you had any issues, I’d appreciate the chance to help you troubleshoot before you rate.

old fashioned oatmeal cookie recipe.

Old Fashioned Oatmeal Cookies Recipe

Yield: 24 cookies
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes

This is the best old fashioned oatmeal cookie recipe you'll ever make. They're soft and chewy with crispy edges and full of hearty oats, warming cinnamon, and plump, sweet raisins. Make a batch and your family will love these delicious oatmeal raisin cookies!

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups / 180 g / 6.3 oz all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups / 170 g / 6 oz old-fashioned oats
  • 3/4 cup / 170 g / 6 oz salted butter, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup / 150 g / 5.3 oz light brown sugar, packed
  • 1/4 cup / 50 g / 1.8 oz granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg, room temperature
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup / 150 g / 5.3 oz raisins

Instructions

  1. Combine dry ingredients. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, oats, baking powder, and cinnamon; set aside.
  2. Cream butter and sugar. Beat the softened butter with both sugars on medium speed until light and fluffy.
  3. Incorporate egg and vanilla. Reduce speed to low; add the egg and vanilla. Beat until well combined, about 1 minute.
  4. Mix dry and wet ingredients. Add flour mixture; mix until almost combined.
  5. Add raisins. Using a rubber spatula or cooking spoon, stir in raisins. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and chill the dough for one hour or overnight.
  6. Prepare for baking. Preheat your oven to 375°F / 190°C / gas mark 5. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.
  7. Drop cookie balls. Using an ice cream scooper (3 tablespoons), drop heaping tablespoon-size balls of dough about 2 inches apart onto the lined baking sheets.
  8. Bake. Bake until the cookies are golden around the edges, but still soft in the center, 8 to 10 minutes.
  9. Cool. Remove from oven and let cool on the cookie sheet for 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely.

Notes

Tips

  • Correctly measure the flour: To properly measure your flour, spoon the flour into the measuring cup until it overflows. Then, use the back of a knife to level the measuring cup at the top. If you press your measuring cup into the flour bag, you will pack in too much flour, resulting in cake-like cookies.
  • Use room temperature ingredients to ensure the butter creams properly, and the egg disperse more evenly into the dough. If you forgot to take out the egg, soak it in a bowl of warm water for 10 minutes to warm them quickly.
  • Soak the raisins: For fruity, plump raisins in your cookies, place them into a small, heat-resistant bowl and cover them with hot water. Let soak for 10 to 15 minutes. Then drain and pat dry before stirring them into the dough.
  • Cream the butter and sugars: By beating the butter with the sugars, you're fluffing up the butter with air, which gives the cookies body and a wonderful, soft texture.
  • Shape the cookies with a cookie scoop to ensure the cookies all have the same size. I recommend a large cookie scoop that can hold 3 tablespoons of dough because who doesn't love big oatmeal cookies?
  • Watch the bake time: The centers should look slightly underdone when you take the oatmeal cookies out of the oven. They will continue to set on the baking sheets. For a softer version, take them out a little early. And for crispier cookies, bake a little longer.
Nutrition Information:
Yield: 24 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 160Total Fat: 7gSaturated Fat: 4gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 23mgSodium: 62mgCarbohydrates: 24gFiber: 1gSugar: 12gProtein: 2g

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