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How to Make Rose Petal Bath Bombs {Natural + Moisturizing Recipe}

See how to make DIY rose petal bath bombs! This all natural bath bomb recipe is made with dried rose petals, coconut oil and essential oils. The tutorial also shows how to form homemade bath bombs with a measuring cup and includes tips for bath bomb storage and shelf life.

Rose Essential Oil Bath Bombs

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DIY rose petal bath bombs – All natural bath bombs recipe

DIY bath bombs are one of my favourite bath recipes, because they are easy to do, yet look impressive, and everyone loves receiving them as a handmade gift. Since we have been sharing a lot of rose inspired beauty recipes lately, I decided to add homemade rose petal bath bombs to the collection.

Not only do these rose bath bombs look stunning, they are also packed with nourishing coconut oil and rose absolute – which means that this bath bomb DIY is both moisturizing and relaxing. And since these natural bath bombs take just 30 minutes to prep (the rest is drying time), you can make this DIY beauty recipe really quickly.

Homemade bath bomb recipe with rose petals

Ingredients for rose petal bath bombs

Wondering how do you make natural bath bombs? You’re in the right place because this a completely natural bath bomb recipe! My homemade rose petal bath bombs are free of artificial dyes or fragrances, but instead made with skin-loving ingredients that will leave your skin feeling soft and supple.

Bath bomb materials

Here is what we need for these handmade bath bombs:

  • baking soda (bicarbonate of soda) and citric acid – Citric acid in combination with baking soda is responsible for the fizzing reaction. I also have a tutorial showing how to make bath bombs without citric acid in case you’re interested.
  • coconut oil – Coconut oil is a versatile ingredient in DIY skincare recipes and for good reason! The oil is very moisturizing and will make your skin feel hydrated and supple. If preferred, you can, swap coconut oil with shea butter or cocoa butter.
  • rose absolute – Rose absolute gives the rose bath bombs a lovely rose fragrance. The oil is helpful in skin rejuvenation, as it can help to reduce the visible signs of ageing. I also find the scent very soothing and calming, just perfect for relaxing in the tub.
  • dried rose petals – A rose petal bath bomb DIY has to include rose petals! The petals are also packed with antioxidants that fight free radicals and are said to reduce oil overproduction in fatty skin types.
  • pink pitaya powder – Pink pitaya is sourced from the red dragon fruit and packed with vitamins, trace minerals and antioxidants. The powder is a completely natural alternative to synthetic dyes and turns the bathwater bright pink. Cyna also used the powder in her rose body wash recipe.

In case you are wondering, yes, these are bath bombs without cornstarch, witch hazel and rubbing alcohol. My goal was to create a no fail bath bomb recipe with as little ingredients as possible.

How to make bath bombs without a mold

I regularly receive questions along the lines of What can I use instead of bath bomb molds or How do you make bath bombs without a mold? And I’m happy to report that there are several ways to shape bath bombs without bath bombs moulds.

You can use a sturdy silicone mould (like I did for these snowflake bath bombs) or a moon press. There also plenty of household items that you can utilise to form bath bombs, e.g. an ice cube trays, cookie cutters, a muffin tray, measuring cups, or a cookie scoop (like in these lavender bath truffles).

However, if you prefer round bath bombs, check out the step by step tutorial in my relaxation bath bomb recipe.

How to form bath bombs with measuring cups – Step by step tutorial

In this post, I want to show you how to use measuring cups to form bath bombs. Almost everyone has measuring cups, and they are great replacements for classic bath bomb moulds. I especially love that you get perfectly shaped disks with straight sides and super sharp edges.

What kind of measuring cups should I use for bath bombs?

Best are sturdy, inexpensive plastic measuring cups. I used a cheap set from Amazon. Metal cups can scratch the work surface and glass or porcelain measuring cups will break, so I do not recommend those.

What is the best size for bath bombs?

1/2 and 1/3 cup pieces are perfect for bath bombs. Be sure also to have 1/4 and 1/8 cups around as well, which we need to compress the bath bomb mixture into the mold.

With that out of the way, let’s see how to make bath bombs with measuring cups!

Make the bath bombs mixture

The first step is to prepare the bath bomb mixture. The instructions are included in the DIY box below, so I won’t repeat them here.

Fill measuring cup with bomb mixture

Add rose petals

Sprinkle a few rose petals into the measuring cup. It’s best to stay clear of the edges as the petals can cause breakage. I also recommend tearing up large petals into smaller pieces.

Fill the cup with mixture

Next, fill the measuring cup with bath bomb mixture. The cup should be filled to the edge.

How to make bath bombs with measuring cup

Compress the mixture

Once the cup is filled, press the mixture down with your fingertips. Then use a measuring cup in a smaller size and further compress the mixture. Pack the mixture as tightly as you can and pay special attention to the edges. The flat bottom of the measuring cups does an excellent job at this and will create a level surface.

Release bath bomb from mold

Unmould the bath bombs

Turn the cup over and firmly tap on your work surface to release the bath bomb. I also like to punch the cup with the back of my hand to ensure the bath bomb comes out. Be careful when lifting the cup.

The bath bombs are very fragile after unmoulding and need to harden for a couple of hours of overnight, ideally in a dry, cool place.

Additional tips

  • Release the bath bombs onto a piece of wax paper so you can lift and move them around for drying.
  • Wipe the inside of the measuring cup clean after every use. Bath bomb mixture tends to stick to leftover residue.
DIY Rose Bath Bombs Recipe

Bath bomb decorations

Rose petal bath bombs are beautiful as they are, so decorating them further is optional. However, I could not resist and decorated my vegan bath bombs with a simple mica paint drip in pink and gold. It looks so elegant and feminine, don’t you think?

Here is how you do it:

  • Add the gold and pink mica powder into 2 separate bowls.
  • Add enough alcohol to form a thick paint.
  • Using a dropper, spritz droplets on the bath bombs.

Allow the natural spa bath bombs to dry before applying the paint. And read this post to learn more about how to paint bath bombs with mica.

Can rose petals go down the drain?

The fizzing bath bombs will dissolve entirely in water expect the rose petals. Before flushing the tub, simply skim the petals from the water surface. You can also put a sink strainer over the drain, which will catch all petals.

DIY rose petal bath bombs on a plate

Storage instructions and shelf life

How do I store DIY bath bombs?

To keep your rose petal bath bombs in top condition, store them in an airtight container at room temperature. Keep the bath bombs away from direct sunlight as the light can deteriorate the essential oil and melt the coconut oil.

Since steam and moisture dissolves bath bombs, try to find a place outside of the bathroom to store your all natural bath bombs recipe. A cupboard is a good option.

If you live in a state with high humidity, I also recommend wrapping each bath bomb in a plastic wrap/clingfilm to protect them from moisture as much as possible.

How long can I keep homemade bath bombs?

Fresh bath bombs have the best smell and fizziness. The shelf life of these cool bath bombs is 6 months, just be sure to store them properly.

DIY Rose Bath Bombs Recipe

More bath bomb recipes

If you like this relaxing bath bombs recipe, you might also like some of my other relaxing bath ideas:

And check out these seasonal bath bomb ideas too:

DIY Rose Petal Bath Bombs Recipe

How to Make Rose Petal Bath Bombs {Natural + Moisturizing Recipe}

Yield: 8 - 12 depending on the mold
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Active Time: 30 minutes
Drying Time: 4 hours
Total Time: 5 hours
Difficulty: easy

See how to make DIY rose petal bath bombs! This all natural bath bomb recipe is made with dried rose petals, coconut oil and essential oils. The tutorial also shows how to form homemade bath bombs with a measuring cup.

Instructions

  1. Melt the coconut oil in a double boiler or in the microwave set to medium in 1-minute intervals.
  2. Let the melted coconut oil cool for 5 minutes before adding the rose absolute. Stir well.
  3. Sift the baking soda and citric acid into a bowl to remove lumps. Stir in the pink pitaya powder.
  4. Knead the melted coconut oil into the dry ingredients.
  5. The mixture should have a consistency similar to damp sand and hold together when pressed into a ball. It’s best to combine with your hands to get a better feel of the texture.
  6. Sprinkle a few rose petals into the measuring cup. It’s best to stay clear of the edges as the petals can cause breakage. I also recommend tearing up large petals into smaller pieces.
  7. Fill the measuring cup with bath bomb mixture. The cup should be filled to the edge.
  8. Once the cup is filled, press the mixture down with your fingertips. Then use a measuring cup in a smaller size and further compress the mixture. Pack the mixture as tightly as you can and pay spe-cial attention to the edges. The flat bottom of the measuring cups does an excellent job at this and will create a level surface.
  9. Turn the cup over and firmly tap on your work surface to release the bath bomb. I also like punch the cup with the back of my hand to ensure the bath bomb comes out. Be careful when lifting the cup.
    Tips: Release the bath bombs onto a piece of wax paper so you can lift and move them around for drying.
  10. Wipe the inside of the measuring cup clean after every use. Bath bomb mixture tends to stick to leftover residue.
  11. The bath bombs are very fragile after unmoulding and need to harden for a couple of hours of overnight, ideally in a dry, cool place.
  12. Let dry for 4 hours or overnight hours. Then seal each bath bomb in plastic wrap/clingfilm and store in an airtight container.

Over to you!

Thanks so much for visiting Country Hill Cottage – we’re so happy you’re here! Have some feedback you’d like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below!

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Irena xx

CC

Sunday 13th of June 2021

Hello! I absolutely love the easy-to-make, yet beautiful bath bombs you've shared here! Other tips you share, such as wrapping the bath bombs to protect them from moisture is also really helpful. One thing I would love to read, though, is whether you found any substitutes for achieving the glitter effect of the gold mica. You mention vegan bath bombs (I'm guessing for environmental friendliness?) but mica is sourced very unethically in India (through child labor and dangerous conditions that). It's a widely public and controversial industry, so I would be very curious if you've found any substitutes for achieving a similar, if not even better, sparkly look! Thank you in advance.

Irena | Country Hill Cottage

Sunday 13th of June 2021

Hi CC! Thank you so much for your lovely comment, I'm glad you find the tips helpful.

Sadly, you're right about the unethically and dangerous sourcing of natural mica. We usually try our best to only work with ingredients of natural origin. The bath bombs themselves are made only from natural ingredients.

But for ethical reasons, I only use synthetic mica (aka synthetic fluorphlogopite). Synthetic mica is plastic-free and has the same characteristics as natural mica. Synthetic mica is brighter in color compared to natural mica and has a more uniform finish (natural mica has an irregular particle size with some particles having sharp edges).

Another option would be to find ethically sourced mica. Of course, you can also omit the mica altogether if you prefer.

I don't know any other material that can create the same shimmer effect as mica. However, you put a few droplets of melted emulsifying wax or Olivem 1000 on the bath bombs and sprinkle the droplets with biodegradable glitter while the wax is still wet.

I hope this helps to answer your concerns and please let me know in case you have another question!

Charley

Thursday 8th of April 2021

Hey there! So, I've found coconut oil so fragrant that it absolutely overpowers the essential oil, so I was wondering if you know if shea butter has less of a smell? Oh, and would I use the same amount of shea butter if I'd want to use it instead of coconut oil? Thanks in advance!

Irena | Country Hill Cottage

Thursday 8th of April 2021

Hi Charley! Yes, you can make the bath bombs with shea butter, the amount is the same.

Unrefined shea butter has a nutty smell. I like this smell but my mother, for example, isn't fond of it. If you go down that route, I recommend using refined shea butter.

An other idea would be to buy refined / deodorized coconut oil, which has no/barely any coconut smell.

I hope this helps you out and please let me know in case you have another question!

Jade Pillay

Friday 5th of March 2021

And how many bath bombs does this mixture make??

Irena | Country Hill Cottage

Saturday 6th of March 2021

The recipe makes 8 to 12 bath bombs depending on the size of the mold.

Jade Pillay

Friday 5th of March 2021

hi there! can you substitute the rose absolute oil for rose essential oil??

Irena | Country Hill Cottage

Saturday 6th of March 2021

Hi Jade! Yes, you can use rose eo instead of the absolute. Happy making!

A Life Adjacent

Thursday 11th of June 2020

So pretty! These would make for lovely gifts, ladies!

Cyna | Country Hill Cottage

Thursday 11th of June 2020

Thanks a lot, ladies!

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