Learn how to make homemade lavender bath bombs. The easy aromatherapy bath bomb recipe has a rich lavender scent and looks beautiful dissolving in water. The simple step-by-step tutorial includes different essential oil blends, the best method for molding bath bombs, and tips for storage and packaging.

diy lavender bath bomb recipe

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Homemade lavender bath bombs

Lavender is one of my favorite scents. And after making lavender soap, body scrub, bath salts, lip balm, and sleep spray, it was high time for bath fizzies. And let me tell you these calming lavender bath bombs are so lovely! They have a rich floral scent, gorgeous color, and will make your skin feel moisturized and pampered.

No need to be intimidated by this bath fizzie recipe – it’s super easy to make at home. I’ll walk you through how to make lavender bath bombs step-by-step, from choosing the materials to making the mixture to molding the DIY lavender bath bomb. Let’s go!

how to make lavender bath bombs

Lavender bath bomb benefits

What do lavender bath bombs do? Lavender bath bombs are a great way to reap the benefits lavender essential oil has to offer. Dissolving in the bath, they infuse the water with nourishing oils and provide a tranquil spa experience.

  • Relaxing: Unwinding in the tub is one of the best ways to unwind after a stressful day. A warm bath will relax tired muscles and joints.
  • Calming: The comforting lavender aroma will calm your mind and alleviate feelings of stress and anxiety. Taking a lavender bath before bed is perfect to promote restful sleep.
  • Soothing: Lavender’s anti-inflammatory properties can soothe acne breakouts, eczema, and dry skin.
  • Moisturizing: My natural bath bomb recipe contains coconut oil, which is very moisturizing and nourishing.

Ingredients for lavender bath bombs

These easy lavender bath bombs are made with simple materials (scroll below for the ingredient amounts):

  • Baking soda (bicarbonate of soda) is the main ingredient in bath fizzies. It must be completely dry – otherwise, the bath bombs won’t dissolve properly.
  • Citric acid is responsible for the fizzing reaction. For the best results, use finely milled citric acid.
  • Coconut oil is needed to bind the ingredients and gives the bath bombs moisturizing qualities. I prefer refined coconut oil so the bath bomb don’t have a coconut smell. Feel free to replace the coconut oil with the same amount shea butter.
  • Lavender essential oil lends the bath bombs a natural scent and aromatherapy benefits. Choosing a high-quality oil is crucial to make the best lavender bath bombs.
  • An emulsifier ensures that the coconut oil, essential oil, and colorant properly mix with the water, not just float atop. You can use Sorbitan oleate as an ECOCERT-approved solution, or Polysorbate 80, which is more easily available.
  • Dried lavender buds (optional) make a lovely natural decoration.
  • Purple mica powder (optional) tints the bath water purple. Purple yam powder is a plant-based alternative if you want a fully natural bath bomb recipe.

You can optionally add up to 3 tablespoons colloidal oats or 2 tablespoons Epsom salt to the homemade bath bomb recipe.

And in case you want foaming lavender bath bombs, stir 3 tablespoons milk powder or SLSA into the mix.

Purple Bath Bombs

Bath bomb making supplies

You’ll also need the following equipment to make bath bombs:

  • Digital scale or measuring cups + spoons
  • Large bowl
  • Fine-mesh sifter to break up any clumps.
  • Whisk to combine ingredients.
  • Bath bomb molds – This set includes bath bomb molds in 3 different sizes.
  • Teaspoon is useful to tap the mold and release the bath bombs.
  • tray or wooden board for drying – I use a wooden board, which I line with wax paper or plastic wrap/clingfilm.
  • Nitrile gloves to protect your hand and nails.

Essential oil blends for lavender bath bombs

These homemade bath bombs are laden with a beautiful fragrance – courtesy of lavender oil! While it’s perfectly fine to scent your bath bombs with a single aroma, it’s also a lot of fun to experiment and create blends. Take a look at these lavender essential oil bath bomb combos for inspiration:

homemade lavender bath bombs

How to make lavender bath bombs

How do you make lavender bath bombs? This natural lavender bath bomb recipe has just a few steps:

Step 1: Melt coconut oil

  • Melt the coconut oil in a double boiler or in the microwave set to medium in 1-minute intervals.
  • Let the melted coconut oil cool for 5 minutes before adding the lavender essential oil and Sorbitan oleate (or Polysorbate 80 if using). Stir well.

Step 2: Sift dry ingredients

  • Sift the baking soda and citric acid through a fine-mesh sifter into a large, glass mixing bowl. Baking soda and citric acid can be clumpy and sifting ensure that your finished bath bombs are smooth and even.
  • Mix thoroughly.

Step 3: Mix bath bomb mixture

  • Pour the melted coconut oil from step 1 over the dry ingredients and combine the mixture really well. I usually start with a whisk but switch to my hands because I find it easier to mix everything evenly and break up any lumps. The consistency of the mixture should be similar to barely damp sand.
  • Tip: Put on nitrile gloves to protect nail polish.

Step 4: Add color

  • Fill half of the bath bomb mixture into another mixing bowl. Add the purple mica to one and incorporate well. Leave the other portion white. Coloring the bath bombs is optional. You can also tint the entire batch.

Step 5: Fill bath bomb molds

  • Sprinkle a few dried lavender buds into one mold. I used about 1/4 teaspoon. The buds will be on top and create a pretty decoration.
  • Next, sprinkle layers of white and purple bath bomb mixture over the buds. Overfill and mound the mold but don’t pack the mixture down.
  • Fill the other half of the mold with mixture.

Step 6: Form bath bombs

  • Press both halves of the mold firmly together, compressing the mixture. Don’t twist the mold as this can break the bath bomb.

Step 7: Unmold the bath bombs

  • Use a spoon to gently tap the mold to loosen the bath bomb from the mold.
  • Carefully, pull off the bottom half, then flip the bath bomb and lift the top one.

Step 8: Dry bath bombs

  • Gently place the bath bombs on a tray or cutting board lined with plastic wrap/cling film.
  • Leave to dry for a few hours or overnight.

How many bath bombs does the recipe yield?

This recipe makes 2 extra-large, 4-5 large, 6 medium, or 10 small bath bombs.

DIY lavender bath bombs FAQ

After publishing bath bomb recipes for many years, I have received all sorts of good questions and decided to share the most requested in a FAQ.

How big are bath bombs?

How big the bath bombs are depends on the size and shape of the mold you use. Classic bath bomb molds come in 2 parts, with one piece fitting inside the other. This handy overview shows typical sizes for round bath bombs:

  • Extra-large bath bomb mold: 3.2 in / 8 cm
  • Large bath bomb mold: 2.4 in / 6 cm
  • Medium mold: 2 in / 5 cm
  • Small mold: 1.6 in / 4 cm

Why do bath bombs halves not stick together?

Bath bomb halves not sticking together is a result of filling the molds incorrectly. Many bath bomb making tutorials say to press the mixture into each half of the mold first and then press the 2 halves together, but that’s wrong.

What happens is that you compress the mixture so much that the 2 halves don’t stick together. It also makes it difficult to release the bath bombs from the mold.

Instead, you want to OVERFILL both pieces and only VERY LIGHTLY pat down the mixture.

Why do bath bombs crack?

Bath bombs can crack for several reasons:

  • Dry mixture: The bath bomb mixture has dried out while making the bath bombs. If you have to leave the project, cover the bath bomb mixture with plastic wrap/cling film, so it doesn’t dry.
  • Not enough pressure: The bath bombs weren’t formed correctly. You need to press the mold firmly together to the bath bomb mixture sticks together.
  • Too much moisture while the bath bombs dry can also cause cracking.

Where in your house do you have bath bombs for drying?

You want to air-dry your homemade bath bombs in dry place, out of direct sunlight. Avoid the kitchen or bathroom because the moisture from cooking/taking a shower will slow (or even prevent) the drying process.

I usually lay my bath bombs on a tray and set up the tray on my dining table. If I need to move the bath bombs, I simply lift the tray and carry them to a new location.

If you live in a hot and dry area, you can pick pretty much any place in your home (safe the kitchen + bathroom).

However, it’s much harder to dry bath bombs in a humid environment. If you leave bath bombs out, they can attract moisture from the air and begin to react. The bath bombs start to expand, and you may even hear a sizzling sound, which is the citric acid and baking soda dissolving.

So, if you live an area with high humidity, try to find the driest spot in your home. Maybe that’s the pantry or a closet. Your best option would probably be a dehumidifier.

Drying bath bombs in the fridge isn’t ideal because often moisture and condensation are trapped inside (the little water drops on the back of the fridge).

Does the coconut oil leave a residue?

Bath bombs that contain oil can leave a residue in the tub, which is why we add an emulsifying agent. The emulsifier ensures that the oils and bathwater mix, and helps the oils wash away when you drain the bath. You might still find a little oil, but you can easily wash it off with the shower head.

What does the bath bomb look in water?

When you see the color of these bath bombs, you think lavender – and girl does it deliver! There’s something so satisfying about watching bath bombs dissolve in water. This one not only smells amazing, but mica turns your bath water into a purple oasis. So good!

lavender bath bomb in water

How to use bath bombs

Fill the tub with water at a comfortable level and temperature. Then add your lavender bath bomb. The bath bomb will fizz and dissolve, releasing moisturizing ingredients, color, and fragrant oils.

Be careful when exiting and entering the tub as coconut oil can make the surface slippery.

Can I use lavender bath bombs during pregnancy? Discuss the safe use of essential oils with a medical professional is you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, or have a medical condition.

Lavender essential oil is considered very gentle and safe for skincare. However, the EO contains small amounts of allergens which can cause irritation in hypersensitive skin types. If you have never used lavender essential oil and are unsure how your skin will react, do a patch test first.

Bath Bombs with Lavender Essential Oil

Storage instructions + shelf life

How do you store bath bombs?

For the best shelf life, be sure to store your bath bombs in a sealed container in a dry, cool place. Avoid direct sunlight and any heat sources because heat will melt the coconut oil and the fragrance will dissipate.

I like to keep my bath bombs in a large glass jar. Glass food containers, Tupperware, or ziptop bags will also work well. Consider wrapping each bath bomb in plastic wrap/clingfilm if you live in a humid climate.

Don’t leave the bath bombs out in the open, because the baking soda will draw moisture from the air and they will lose the fizziness. Once a bath bomb has absorbed enough moisture, it won’t react, and the scent will become faint.

How long will homemade bath bombs last?

This lavender bath bomb recipe will be good for 6 to 9 months. Although baking soda, citric acid, coconut oil, and lavender essential oil have a long shelf life, bath bombs start to lose their fizz and scent overtime.

Storing bath bombs airtight is key to achieve a long shelf life and preserve the fizzing reaction. If bath bombs are exposed, they will draw moisture, which will lessen the effectiveness of the baking soda and citric acid.

Although fresh bath bombs have the best fizz, I’ve used 2-year-old bath bombs without issue. Be sure to follow my tips on how to store bath bombs, so you can enjoy your creations for a long time.

natural essential oil bath bombs

More bath bomb recipes

If you like my natural lavender bath bombs, you might enjoy some of my other bath bomb recipes, too:

And check out these seasonal bath bomb ideas too:

Yield: 5-7 bath bombs

Lavender Bath Bombs Recipe

homemade lavender bath bombs

Learn how to make the best lavender bath bombs step by step. The simple essential oil bath bomb recipe has a rich lavender scent and looks beautiful dissolving in water. The simple tutorial includes. different scent blends, the best method for molding bath bombs, and tips for storage and packaging.

Prep Time 30 minutes
Additional Time 6 hours
Total Time 6 hours 30 minutes
Difficulty intermediate

Materials

Tools

Instructions

  1. Melt coconut oil. Melt the coconut oil in a double boiler or in the microwave set to medium in 1-minute intervals. Let the melted coconut oil cool for 5 minutes before adding the lavender essential oil and Sorbitan oleate (or Polysorbate 80 if using). Stir well.
  2. Sift dry ingredients. Sift the baking soda and citric acid through a fine-mesh sifter into a large, glass mixing bowl. Baking soda and citric acid can be clumpy and sifting ensure that your finished bath bombs are smooth and even. Mix thoroughly.
  3. Mix bath bomb mixture Pour the melted coconut oil from step 1 over the dry ingredients and combine the mixture really well. I usually start with a whisk but switch to my hands because I find it easier to mix everything evenly and break up any lumps. The consistency of the mixture should be similar to barely damp sand.
    Tip: Put on nitrile gloves to protect nail polish.
  4. Add color. Fill half of the bath bomb mixture into another mixing bowl. Add the purple mica to one and incorporate well. Leave the other portion white. Coloring the bath bombs is optional. You can also tint the entire batch.
  5. Fill bath bomb molds. Sprinkle a few dried lavender buds into one mold. I used about 1/4 teaspoon. The buds will be on top and create a pretty decoration. Next, sprinkle layers of white and purple bath bomb mixture over the buds. Overfill and mound the mold but don’t pack the mixture down. Fill the other half of the mold with mixture.
  6. Form bath bombs. Press both halves of the mold firmly together, compressing the mixture. Don’t twist the mold as this can break the bath bomb.
  7. Unmold the bath bombs. Use a spoon to gently tap the mold to loosen the bath bomb from the mold. Carefully, pull off the bottom half, then flip the bath bomb and lift the top one.
  8. Dry bath bombs. Gently place the bath bombs on a tray or cutting board lined with plastic wrap/cling film. Leave to dry for a few hours or overnight.

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